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metis - rights list fiction 2011
 
  
  
  
Genel Katalog - Açık
  
 
Language of the Downtrodden, Nurdan Gürbilek
Metis Nonfiction

13 x 19.5 cm, 176 pp
ISBN No. 975-342-660-2

Prints:
1st Print: March 2008
2nd Print: August 2008
Nurdan Gürbilek
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About the Author
One of the foremost cultural critics in Turkey, Nurdan Gürbilek is the author of Vitrinde Yaşamak (Life in the Shopwindow, 1992), an analysis of the cultural dynamics of the 1980s in Turkey. Her other publications include Yer Değiştiren Gölge (Shifting Shadow, 1995) and Ev Ödevi (Homework, 1999), collection of essays on modern Turkish writers. She is also the author of Kötü Çocuk Türk (Bad Boy Turk, 2001), an analysis of some of the significant images and tropes in modern Turkish literature and popular culture. In her last book Kör Ayna, Kayıp Şark (Orient Lost, 2004) Gürbilek explores the sexual anxieties accompanying the Ottoman-Turkish literary modernization. Nurdan Gürbilek also edited, translated and introduced Son Bakışta Aşk (Love at Last Sight, 1993), a collection of essays in Turkish by Walter Benjamin. She is currently working on a book on Dostoyevsky’s "underground tragedy" and its counterparts in modern Turkish literature.
Other Books from Metis
Vitrinde Yaşamak (Life in the Shopwindow), 1992
Yer Değiştiren Gölge (Shifting Shadow), 1995
Ev Ödevi (Homework), 1999
Kötü Çocuk Türk (Bad Boy Turk), 2001
Kör Ayna, Kayıp Şark (Orient Lost), 2004 (Orient Lost), 2004
Nurdan Gürbilek
Language of the Downtrodden

Mağdurun Dili

One of the most important literary and cultural critics in Turkey, Nurdan Gürbilek explores in her recent book that area where literature intersects with ostracization in the light of remarkable novels by Dostoevsky, Oğuz Atay, Yusuf Atılgan, and Cemil Meriç. She tries to understand both how literature may shed light on being trodden down, which is usually regarded through clichés, and how the sense of being ostracized shapes literature itself. She analyses how that con-flict, which Dostoevsky called "the tragedy of the underground," that compulsory retreat into the underground made up both of great dreams and of resentment, affects the author's relationship with his reader. She discusses the wounded pride in literature, the hubris of the author, and why the reader insists on seeing a victory in the failure to hold on to life.