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Genel Katalog - Açık
  
 
Y'ol, Birhan Keskin
Metis Fiction
Poetry
13 x 19.5 cm, 72 pp
ISBN No. 975-342-561-9

Prints:
1st Print: April 2006
2nd Print: July 2006
Birhan Keskin
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About the Author
Winner of the 2006 Golden Orange Poetry Award, Birhan Keskin published her first poem in 1984. Between 1995-1998, she edited the literary journal Göçebe. She has worked as an editor in various publishing companies. Keskin’s five poetry books published between 1991-2002 were combined in one volume Kim Bağışlayacak Beni (Who Will Forgive Me, 2005) and her award-winning Ba was also published in 2005. Y’ol (2006) is her latest book.
Other Books from Metis
Kim Bağışlayacak Beni (Who Will Forgive Me), 2005
Ba, (2005)
Birhan Keskin
Y’ol

Y’ol

Reviews
"The book has two channels, and some of the poems cross over from one to the other. One channel is extremely fretful and enraged, and thus raw, whereas the other is calm, serene and resigned. Yet I’ve never had any ambitions as to refining the word in poetry, instead I sought to figure out how it may be possible to be refined towards the word, with the word. My aspiration has been to make myself be, as I make my way to poetry."
– Birhan Keskin

One of the most celebrated Turkish poets of the younger generation, Birhan Keskin has been perfecting her poetry for the past 20 years. Her latest publication Y’ol is a masterly collection made up of two sections. The first one, her longest poem to date in 42 parts, laments lost love and reads like a raw but beautiful howl – utterly elegant in its crudity. The second section is made up of 14 separate poems, more crystallized, calmer and more contemplative.
REVIEWS
Kemal Varol, Radikal Kitap Eki, 5 May 2006
"Y’ol has the quality of an exquisite inventory of the violence in the everyday, of the injustice that derives its glow precisely from the everyday. And yet even with all their coarseness, with the split road, the breached bond, these poems are more of separation and lament than of settling accounts... A major gift to the language.”